1967 Quarter (No Mint Mark)




CoinTrackers.com estimates the value of a 1967 Washington Quarter in average condition to be worth 80 cents, while one in mint state could be valued around $25.00. - Last updated: November, 01 2022


1967 Quarter (No Mint Mark)
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  • Year: 1967
  • Mint Mark: No mint mark
  • Type: Quarter Dollar
  • Price: 80 cents-$25.00+
  • Face Value: 0.25 USD
  • Produced: 1,524,031,000
  • Edge: Reeded





Notes: Based on age alone this coin is worth more to a collector than .25 face value.


1967 Quarter Information(Click to Enlarge Image)

1967 Quarter Errors listed here. The 1967 Quarter has more errors than most coins this year. There are many instances of this coin being struck on mismatched planchets. Examples found include; struck on 5c planchet, struck on penny planchet, struck on dime planchet. Unrelated errors include clipped and die break strikes. All of the errors listed are worth many hundreds of dollars in MS conditions.


(Click to Enlarge Image)


1967 Quarter Struck on Copper

This error coin is easily distinguishable because of its reddish orange hue. A Type II planchet (planchet with rim), was struck with a 1967 Quarter Die resulting in a reddish quarter that is missing a small portion of the outer rim. The edge will also be smooth and not reeded.


1967 Quarter Struck on Nickel Planchet

Harder to distinguish than the copper penny error, the struck on a 5C nickel planchet is a 1967 Quarter struck on a Type II Nickel planchet. A small portion of this outermost portion of this design is missing as the nickel planchet is smaller than that of a quarter.


1967 Quarter Struck on 10C Dime Planchet

This quarter is a little larger than a dime, has the same weight of 2.268 gram, and roughly the same diameter of a dime at just 17.91 mm. A large portion of the design will be missing as the quarter die has a larger diameter and not all of the image would have transferred.


1967 Quarter Clip Error

Both curved and straight clipped errors are known to exist. The curve clip is thought to be created when the planchet is struck again by the machine that punches the planchets out from the larger sheet of metal.


Off Center Strikes

The die strikes the type II planchet off center and leaves a small portion of clear smooth coin behind this is called an off center strike. Off center strikes can be as much as 90% off center occasionally, but are most often very minor at 10%-30%


Price Chart

This section is more for experienced collectors only, and rates refer only to professionally graded and slabbed coins. If you are new to collecting the prices below may not make much sense.


Breakdown of pricing per condition for 1967 Quarter (No Mint Mark) as follows.


  • Grade MS62 = $6-$10
  • Grade MS63 = $9-$15
  • Grade MS64 = $11-$19
  • Grade MS65 = $13-$21
  • Grade MS66 = $14-$24
  • Grade MS67 = $26-$44
  • Grade MS68 = $49-$81


Is the list above a little overwhelming? If so, take 5 minutes to learn all about Coin Grading.


It's also important to note...Prices are subject to the same supply and demand laws as everything else. Coins sold at the same auction house 10x, would fetch drastically different bids each session. To raise your chances of receiving top dollar read How to Get the Most for your Coins.


We've personally researched these values. If you enjoy our content please return the favor and share this page with your friends.
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Mintage Numbers

Production Chart

Comments

David Young: Found one of these today looks to be in mint condition. Approved: 2022-11-01 20:04:57



Admin: Nice find David. Happy hunting! Approved: 2022-11-04 20:04:57




How much is a 1967 Quarter (No Mint Mark) worth?

This section is more of a layman's guide, for those new to collecting.

In Average Circulated (AC) condition it's worth around 80 cents, one in certified mint state (MS+) condition could bring as much as $25 at auction. This price does not reference any standard coin grading scale. So when we say Average Circulated, we mean in a similar condition to other coins circulated in 1967, and mint state meaning it is certified MS+ by one of the top coin grading companies. *** [?].


If you are a fan of coin roll hunting or just want to learn more about washington quarters then search or scroll below to find the most valuable and rarest in this series.




Most Valuable

The most valuable Washington Quarter's. Prices listed are for MS-65 certified. Visit the link to learn more about each coin.

Image Year Mint Worth
Washington Quarter 1932 D $21k
Washington Quarter 1932 S $5,532
Washington Quarter 1936 D $1.3k
Washington Quarter 1935 D $925
Washington Quarter 1936 S $500
Washington Quarter 1944 D $500
Washington Quarter 1937 S $485
Washington Quarter 1934 D $480
Washington Quarter 1932 $450
Washington Quarter 1935 S $400
Washington Quarter 1940 D $360
Washington Quarter 1938 $325
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1989 P $345.22
1989 $345,000
1989 D $345
Image Name Mint Worth

Want more? Click here to see the most valuable coins ever minted.

Hardest to Find

The rarest and hardest to find Washington Quarter's Check out each link to learn more about each coin.

What is the rarest Washington Quarter?

Name Produced
1932 S 408,000
1932 D 436,000
1995 S 679,000
1997 S 741,000
1993 S 761,000
1996 S 775,000
1994 S 785,000
1998 S 878,000
1992 S 1,317,000
1937 S 1,652,000
1996 S 1,750,000
1997 S 2,055,000
1998 S 2,086,000
1995 S 2,117,000
1994 S 2,484,000
1974 S 2,612,000
1939 S 2,628,000
1970 S 2,632,000
1993 S 2,633,000
1973 S 2,760,000
Name Produced

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***Price subject to standard supply and demand laws, dealer premiums, and other market variations. Prices represent past values fetched at online auctions, estate sales, certified coins being sold by dealers, and user submitted values. While we wholeheartedly try to give honest price estimates there are many factors besides appearance, metal content, and rarity that help make up the coins overall value. Call or visit your local coin dealer for more information.

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